The inverse square law lab

Posted on Updated on

 

 

 

1. Do your observed values follow your expected values?

 

As shown on the table, the amount of radiation reaching to surface is nearly inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the source and the surface. My observed values in general almost follow my expected values but they are not exactly same that I accepted.

 

2. Do your observed values follow the inverse square law? Give an example from your readings.

 

Generally the inverse square law describes that the intensity of a radiation field is inversely proportional to the square of the distance from the source. In my observed value, where distance is 80 cm the mR is 126. With increasing distant to 160 cm we can see the mR changes to 26. That means with double increasing distance, the radiation intensity de creased almost 4 times.

 

3. List two important applications of the inverse square law for diagnostic imaging. (2 marks)

 

Consideration to patient does and employee dose are two important applications of the inverse square law for diagnostic imaging. Since the radiation spreads out as it moves away from the X-ray source.  Therefore, the intensity of the radiation follows Inverse Square Law.  As a result the intensity of radiation becomes weaker as it spreads out from the source since the same about of radiation becomes spread over a larger area.  The intensity is inversely proportional to the distance from the source.  In radiography, it is necessary to calculate the intensity at a second distance. The inverse square law can be used to analyse alters in intensity that happen as a result of changes in distance.