Resources for student of Red Robber College ” Medical Radiology” – Winnipeggers, experiencing racism or discrimination

Posted on Updated on

1. What are my human rights?
As human beings we are all entitled to basic rights which recognize our individual worth and dignity. These are your human rights. In Canada, the following statutes and laws have been put in place to protect those rights.
 Canadian Human Rights Act (http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/h-6/ )
 Charter of Rights and Freedoms (http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/Const/Const_index.html )
 Employment Equity Act (http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/e-5.401/index.html)
 The Manitoba Human Rights Code (http://web2.gov.mb.ca/laws/statutes/ccsm/h175e.php)
2. How do I know if I’m being discriminated against?
Discrimination happens when you are denied the same opportunities, services and privileges given to others because of your ancestry, ethnic background or origin, nationality, age, sex (including sex determined characteristics such as pregnancy), gender identity, sexual orientation, marital or family status, source of income, political belief, physical or mental disability and social disadvantage. These groups are referred to as “protected characteristics” in Manitoba’s Human Rights Code.
Discrimination under Manitoba’s Human Rights Code is:
 Treating someone differently, to their disadvantage and without a valid reason or;
 Harassing another person with abusive and unwelcome conduct or comments or;
 Failing to take steps to accommodate special needs
These actions must be based on the grounds or “protected characteristics” outlined in the Human Rights Code.
The Human Rights Code prohibits unreasonable discrimination in areas such as employment, housing, the provision of services, signage and notices.
3. What is the difference between the Human Rights Code (Manitoba)
and the Canadian Human Rights Act?
For the most part the differences are in jurisdiction and process. The Canadian Human Rights Act deals with complaints against federally regulated organizations (i.e. banks, airlines, radio and television stations, etc.). The Manitoba Human Rights Commission is the agency responsible for carrying out the provisions of the Manitoba’s Human Rights Code whereas the Canadian Human
Rights Commission carries out the provisions of the Canadian Human Rights Act. The “Protected Characteristics” differ slightly between Manitoba’s Human Rights Code and the Canadian Human
Rights Act. For example the Canada Human Rights Act includes pardoned criminal convictions
Resources for Winnipeggers experiencing racism or discrimination
Prepared by Winnipeg CMARD, 2013

among its protected characteristics, but at this time does not include gender identity or social disadvantage, which are among Manitoba’s protected grounds.
4. How can Winnipeg CMARD help me?
Winnipeg CMARD does not provide direct assistance with human rights complaints or violations.
However, Winnipeg CMARD will be able to provide basic resources and information for victims ofracism and discrimination. Please note, this information is not meant to take the place of legaladvice as provided by a lawyer. The following organizations may be helpful in assisting you with
legal advice and/or legal representation:
 Public Interest Law Centre (http://publicinterestlawcentre.ca/)
The Public Interest Law Centre provides legal representation and help to those who qualify.
Depending on your financial circumstances, you may also be able to receive services at a reduced cost.
 Community Legal Education Association (CLEA) (http://www.communitylegal.mb.ca/)
The CLEA operates a lawyer phone-in and referral service as well public legal education workshops and classes.
 University of Manitoba Legal Aid Centre (http://www.legalaid.mb.ca/)
The University of Manitoba Legal Aid Centre provides free legal advice given by University of Manitoba law students.
 Legal Help Centre (http://legalhelpcentre.ca/)
The Legal Help Centre provides both legal referrals and information. The Centre also operates a
Drop-in Clinic to those families whose income is under $50,000 per year. The Drop-in Clinic
provides legal information, help in accessing services and legal advice from law students who operate under the supervision of a lawyer.
5. What do I do if I feel discriminated against by my neighbor?
If you feel you have been the victim of a hate crime which could be criminal in nature call the police immediately.
Winnipeg Police, non-emergency phone: 204-986-6222
6. What do I do if I feel discriminated against by an employer?
Many organizations have a Respectful Workplace Policy already in place to deal with issues ofdiscrimination, harassment, and conflict in the workplace. If you feel you have been the victim of Resources for Winnipeggers experiencing racism or discrimination Prepared by Winnipeg CMARD, 2013

racism or discrimination, speak to you supervisor or Human Resources Personnel as soon as possible to help you in addressing the incident.
However, if you are unable to find a resolution after talking to your supervisor or Human
Resources Department, you are entitled to file a human rights complaint.
If your employer is under Manitoba jurisdiction (schools, hospitals, colleges, universities,
provincial and city government, restaurants, retail stores etc.) contact the Manitoba Human
Rights Commission (http://www.www.manitobahumanright.ca) at:
Manitoba Human Rights Commission
7th Floor-175 Hargrave Street
Winnipeg, MB R3C 3R8
TOLL FREE: 1-888-884-8681
TTY: 1-888-897-2811
Email: hrc@gov.mb.ca
Complaints must be filed with the commission within one (1) year of the incident.
Should you decide to resolve your complaint informally the Commission may provide you with mediation services in which to help you resolve the issue. If this is an option you wish to pursue contact the Manitoba Human Rights Commission directly for more details.
If the complaint filed is against a federally regulated organization (i.e. banks, transportation, radio and television stations etc.) contact the Canadian Human Rights Commission at
http://www.chrc-ccdp.ca.
The Canadian Human Rights Commission is also responsible for ensuring compliance with the
Employment Equity Act and with the Canadian Human Rights Act, these laws ensure that the
principles of equal opportunity and non-discrimination are followed in all areas of federal
jurisdiction.
Contact the Human Rights Commission at:
344 Slater Street, 8th Floor
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 1E1
Phone: 613 995-1151
Toll Free: 1-888-214-1090
TTY: 613 995-6211
TTY: 1-888-643-3304
Fax: 613 996-9661
Resources for Winnipeggers experiencing racism or discrimination
Prepared by Winnipeg CMARD, 2013

7. What do I do if I feel discriminated against by a service provider,
or business?
No one should feel harassed or discriminated against when seeking services at a business or
organization. Many businesses and organizations already have policies in place to ensure
customers receive fair and equitable treatment regardless of their age, sex, race or ability. Should you feel this has not been the case for you, speak to a manager or supervisor directly to assist you in addressing the issue.
However, when concerns cannot be resolved at the organizational level, you have the right to file a human rights complaint.
If the service provider or business is under Manitoba jurisdiction (schools, hospitals, colleges,universities, provincial and city government, restaurants, retail stores etc.) contact the Manitoba
Human Rights Commission (http://www.www.manitobahumanright.ca) at:
Manitoba Human Rights Commission
7th Floor-175 Hargrave Street
Winnipeg, MB R3C 3R8
TOLL FREE: 1-888-884-8681
TTY: 1-888-897-2811
Email: hrc@gov.mb.ca
Complaints must be filed with the commission within one (1) year of the incident.
Should you decide to resolve your complaint informally the Commission may provide you with mediation services in which to help you resolve the issue. If this is an option you wish to pursue contact the Manitoba Human Rights Commission directly for more details.
If the complaint filed is against a federally regulated organization (i.e. banks, transportation, radio and television stations etc.) contact the Canadian Human Rights Commission at
http://www.chrc-ccdp.ca.
Contact the Human Rights Commission at:
344 Slater Street, 8th Floor
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 1E1
Phone: 613 995-1151
Toll Free: 1-888-214-1090
TTY: 613 995-6211
TTY: 1-888-643-3304
Fax: 613 996-9661
Resources for Winnipeggers experiencing racism or discrimination
Prepared by Winnipeg CMARD, 2013

8. What do I do if I feel discriminated against by the police?
Contact the Manitoba Human Rights Commission or The Law Enforcement Review Act (LERA)
(http://www.gov.mb.ca/justice/lera/complaint.html#towhom)
The Law Enforcement Review Act deals with any complaint against a municipal police officer who has discriminated against a citizen based on their race, nationality, religion, colour, sex, marital status, physical or mental handicap, age, source of income, family status, political belief, or ethnic or national origin
Contact The Law Enforcement Review Act at:
Law Enforcement Review Agency
420-155 Carlton Street
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3C 3H8
In Winnipeg phone: 204 945-8667
Outside Winnipeg, call toll free at 1-800-282-8069
Fax: 204 948-1014
Or you can contact the Commissioner by email: lera@gov.mb.ca
Your complaint must be in writing and you must sign it. It should include the date, time, location and any other details of the incident. Should you need help, LERA or members of the police service are able to help you prepare your complaint. Contact LERA or your local police station for more details.
Please note that any complaint must be filed within thirty (30) days of the incident.
9. What do I do if I feel discriminated against in by a landlord?
Contact the Manitoba Human Rights Commission
(http://www.manitobahumanrights.ca/guidelines_rentalhousing.html)
(http://www.manitobahumanrights.ca/guidelines_condohousing.html)
10. What do I do if I feel discriminated against by a government
employee?
Contact the Manitoba Human Rights Commission or the Manitoba Ombudsman
(http://www.ombudsman.mb.ca/ombudsman.htm)
Resources for Winnipeggers experiencing racism or discrimination
Prepared by Winnipeg CMARD, 2013

The Manitoba Ombudsman investigates complaints from anyone who feels they have been
treated unfairly by the provincial government or a municipal government including the City of Winnipeg.
To file a complaint, or for more information, please visit the Manitoba Ombudsman website at
http://www.ombudsman.mb.ca/howto-complaint.htm.
11. Where do I go if I feel discriminated against at school?
All students deserve to learn in an environment free from discrimination.
If you are a student in high school, middle school or elementary and you feel like you are being
bullied:
Talk to your teacher, principal or trusted adult immediately to let them know what is going on.
Schools have clear policies and procedures on what to do when someone is being bullied.
Many schools also have peer support to assist students in conflict including Conflict Managers and
Peer Helpers.
If you are a student in college or at University and you feel you are being discriminated against
there are several services at the University level that may be able to help you resolve your
dispute.
University of Manitoba:
Student Advocacy ( http://umanitoba.ca/student/resource/student_advocacy/index.html)
The Student Advocacy Office works with students who bring forth complaints or grievances, and
provides information regarding student rights and responsibilities. The Office also helps with
resolution of any concerns resulting from academic or discipline decisions made at the University
level.
Contact:
Student Advocacy
519 University Centre
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 Canada
Phone: 204 474-7423
Fax: 204 474-7567
Email: student_advocacy@umanitoba.ca
University of Winnipeg:
The University of Winnipeg Students’ Association (UWSA) (http://theuwsa.ca/advocacy/appeals/)
Resources for Winnipeggers experiencing racism or discrimination
Prepared by Winnipeg CMARD, 2013

The UWSA employs full time staff who can assist students with advocacy and assistance with any
complaints or appeals at the University level.
Contact:
Vice President Advocate
Bulman Students’ Centre
0R30-515 Portage Avenue
Winnipeg, MB R3B 2E9
Email: vpa@theuwsa.ca
Phone: 204 786-9780
Red River College:
Red River College Students’ Association (http://rrcsa.ca/?page_id=75)
The Students’ Association provides information and assistance to students who feel Red River
College has made a decision that is unjust or discriminatory.
Contact:
Notre Dame Campus office (phone): 204 632-2375
The Roblin Centre (Exchange District Campus) office (phone): 204 949-8475.
You can also contact the Manitoba Human Rights Commission.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s