Radiographic Procedures Guide

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Abdomen X-Ray Positioning

ACBE X-Ray Positioning

AC-Joints X-Ray Positioning

Ankle X-Ray Positioning

Appendix X-Ray Positioning

Barium Enema X-Ray Positioning

Bone Age Study X-Ray Positioning

Bone Length Study X-Ray Positioning

Cardiovascular Studies X-Ray Positioning

Chest X-Ray Positioning

Cholangiogram X-Ray Positioning

Clavicle X-Ray Positioning

Coccyx X-Ray Positioning

C-spine X-Ray Positioning

Elbow X-Ray Positioning

ERCP X-Ray Positioning

Facial Bones X-Ray Positioning

Femur X-Ray Positioning

Foot X-Ray Positioning

Forearm X-Ray Positioning

Gallbladder X-Ray Positioning

Hand X-Ray Positioning

Hip X-Ray Positioning

Hip Arthrogram X-Ray Positioning

Humerus X-Ray Positioning

Knee X-Ray Positioning

Knee Arthrogram X-Ray Positioning

Loopogram X-Ray Positioning

L-Spine X-Ray Positioning

Long Bone Study X-Ray Positioning

Metastatic Bone Survey X-Ray Positioning

Modified Barium Swallow X-Ray Positioning

Nasal Bone X-Ray Positioning

Orbits X-Ray Positioning

Pacemaker X-Ray Positioning

Pelvis X-Ray Positioning

Postural Study X-Ray Positioning

Retrograde Urethrogram X-Ray Positioning

Ribs X-Ray Positioning

Sacrum X-Ray Positioning

SBFT X-Ray Positioning

Scanogram X-Ray Positioning

Scapula X-Ray Positioning

SC-Joints X-Ray Positioning

Scoliosis X-Ray Positioning

Shoulder X-Ray Positioning

Shoulder Arthrogram X-Ray Positioning

Sialogram X-Ray Positioning

SI-Joints X-Ray Positioning

Sinuses X-Ray Positioning

Skeletal Survey X-Ray Positioning

Sternum X-Ray Positioning

Tib Fib X-Ray Positioning

TMJ X-Ray Positioning

Truama C-Spine X-Ray Positioning

Trauma Hip X-Ray Positioning

Trauma Humerous X-Ray Positioning

Trauma Shoulder X-Ray Positioning

T-spine X-Ray Positioning

T-Tube Cholangiogram X-Ray Positioning

VCUG X-Ray Positioning

Venogram X-Ray Positioning

Wrist X-Ray Positioning

Zygoma X-Ray Positioning

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One thought on “Radiographic Procedures Guide

    MR responded:
    February 5, 2015 at 8:53 am

    Stressors High for Radiation Therapists

    Jan 23, 2015

    Radiation therapists have higher average scores for stressors and coping strategies than radiation oncology nurses, according to a study published in the Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences.

    Researchers at the Radiation Oncologist Mater Center in Brisbane, Australia, distributed a survey questionnaire to radiation therapists and oncology nurses at two tertiary hospitals. Seventy-one individuals completed the questionnaire, which focused on potential stressors at home and work and preferred stress coping mechanisms. In addition, respondents were asked to complete a survey measuring resilience, mental well-being, depression, anxiety and burnout.

    According to the results, both groups reported heavy workload as the most severe workplace stressor. Although the types of stressors varied between groups, radiation therapists reported higher average frequencies of stressors and coping strategies. There were no identifiable differences between the groups in the types or effectiveness of coping strategies employed at home or in the workplace.

    In addition, the groups did not experience significantly different levels of anxiety, depression, burnout, mental well-being or resilience.

    Their results were the catalyst for the authors to design a one-day interventional workshop for radiation therapists and oncology nurses to improve the personal resources of workers coping with stress.

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