Chest Positioning

Posted on Updated on

Name Positioning
PA Chest T7
Lateral Chest T7
AP Chest 7.6 cm below the jugular notch
AP  Axial Chest (Lordatic) Midsternum
AP  Axial Chest 15-20 degrees cephalad, Midsternum
AP  Decubitus Chest 7.6 cm below the jugular notch
PA  Decubitus Chest T7
Dorsal Decubitus Chest 7.6 – 10.2 cm below the jugular notch
Ventral Decubitus Chest T7
AP Ribs Above Diaphragm Up: 3.8 cm above the upper border of the relaxed shoulders
AP Ribs Below Diaphragm Down: Iliac Crest
PA Oblique Ribs Above Diaphragm Up: 3.8 cm above the upper border of the shoulders
PA Oblique Ribs Below Diaphragm Down: Iliac Crest
AP Oblique Ribs Above Diaphragm Up: 3.8 cm above the upper border of the shoulders
AP Oblique Ribs Below Diaphragm Down: Iliac Crest
Advertisements

17 thoughts on “Chest Positioning

    CSS said:
    August 14, 2014 at 12:20 pm

    I am so grateful for your article.Really looking forward to read more. Awesome.
    HTML5

    rrem pathway b said:
    August 14, 2014 at 5:46 am

    Thanks for the blog.Much thanks again. Really Cool.
    RREM Contractor

    Wake Up Now Products said:
    August 13, 2014 at 3:30 pm

    Looking forward to reading more. Great post.Thanks Again. Really Great.
    Wake Up Now explained

    RREM Contractor said:
    August 12, 2014 at 7:11 am

    I am so grateful for your post.Really thank you! Great.
    fema approved contractor

    casual dating said:
    August 11, 2014 at 2:03 pm

    Thanks a lot for the blog article.Much thanks again. Really Great.
    casual relationship

    Car Hire Modlin Airport said:
    August 11, 2014 at 8:06 am

    I cannot thank you enough for the blog post.Much thanks again. Really Great.
    Modlin Car Hire

    website templates for dreamweaver said:
    August 9, 2014 at 6:13 am

    Really appreciate you sharing this blog post.Really thank you! Awesome.
    Adobe Dreamweaver templates

    handmade glass said:
    August 8, 2014 at 4:28 am

    Really appreciate you sharing this blog article.Much thanks again. Want more.
    handmade glass

    Survival watches said:
    August 7, 2014 at 12:04 pm

    Thanks for sharing, this is a fantastic article post.Thanks Again. Want more.
    Survival watches

    opinie o produktach said:
    August 7, 2014 at 5:24 am

    Really appreciate you sharing this article post.Really thank you! Cool.
    blog tomasza zdrowe opinie

    windows optimization said:
    August 6, 2014 at 2:51 am

    Very good blog article. Fantastic.
    fix slow pc

    Leather furniture cleaning DC said:
    August 5, 2014 at 5:11 am

    I really enjoy the blog.Much thanks again. Great.
    Upholstery cleaning DC

    chemistry tuition singapore said:
    August 4, 2014 at 1:02 pm

    I think this is a real great blog post.Much thanks again. Fantastic.
    chem paper topics

    video marketing said:
    August 4, 2014 at 2:03 am

    Looking forward to reading more. Great article post.Much thanks again. Much obliged.
    video marketing

    man and van said:
    August 1, 2014 at 9:49 am

    Really appreciate you sharing this article. Really Great.
    cheap man and van

    best 10 inch tablet said:
    July 31, 2014 at 4:15 am

    Very good blog article.Really looking forward to read more. Great.
    what is the best tablet

    Radiology News said:
    March 5, 2013 at 4:18 pm

    Electronic Nose Sniffs Out Side Effects of Radiotherapy
    By Medimaging International staff writers
    Posted on 05 Mar 2013

    ADVERTISEMENT

    Researchers have recently completed a study that may lead to clinicians being able to more effectively predict which patients will suffer from the side effects of radiotherapy.

    Gastrointestinal side effects are typical occurrences in radiotherapy patients and are at times severe, but there are no existing means of predicting which patients will suffer from them. The pilot study’s findings, published September 2012 in the journal Sensors, described how the use of an electronic nose and a newer technology, field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) might help identify those at higher risk.

    University of Warwick Medical School (Coventry, UK), working in collaboration with the School of Engineering and The Royal Marsden NHS [National Health Service] Foundation Trust (London, UK), led by Dr. J. Andreyev, conducted a pilot study to look into the connection between levels of toxicity in the gut and the probability of suffering side effects.

    Dr. Ramesh Arasaradnam, from Warwick Medical School and gastroenterologist at University Hospitals Coventry & Warwickshire, summarized the outcome of the study findings. “In the simplest terms, we believe that patterns in toxicity levels arise from differences in a patient’s gut microflora. By using this technology we can analyze stool samples and sniff out the chemicals that are produced by these microflora to better predict the risk of side effects.”

    The pilot study’s success should lead to a wider study into the possible uses of these technologies and could be truly significant in helping clinicians inform patients receiving pelvic radiotherapy, before treatment is initiated. Dr. Arasaradnam clarified what this could suggest for radiotherapy patients, “In essence, we will be able to predict those who are likely to develop severe gut related side effects by the pattern of gut fermentation that are altered as a result of radiotherapy. This will enable future directed therapy in these high risk groups.”

    Dr. James Covington, from the Warwick School of Engineering, added, “This technology offers considerable opportunities for the future. This shows just one application of being able to inform treatment by ‘sniffing’ patients. We foresee a time when such technology will become as routine a diagnostic test as checking blood pressure is today.”

    In 2009, the same cutting edge gas sensor technology was taken from the automotive world and used to research into faster diagnosis for some gastrointestinal illnesses and metabolic disorders.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s