Osgood-Schlatter Disease

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12 thoughts on “Osgood-Schlatter Disease

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    Osgood-Schlatter said:
    December 4, 2011 at 9:10 pm

    What is Osgood-Schlatter disease?

    Osgood-Schlatter disease is a disorder of the lower front of the knee where the large tendon under the kneecap (patellar tendon) attaches to the bone of the leg below. The condition is characterized by localized pain and tenderness in this area. Osgood-Schlatter disease is predominantly seen in young adolescent boys. It is felt that stress on the bone from the tendon tugging it during activities leads to Osgood-Schlatter disease.

    What are symptoms of Osgood-Schlatter disease?

    Osgood-Schlatter disease is felt to be due in part to recurrent pulling tension on the kneecap tendon by the bulky muscles of the front of the thigh. The irritation of this pulling can cause local pain, inflammation, swelling, and calcification of the tendon that is visible with an x-ray test.

    How is Osgood-Schlatter disease diagnosed?

    Osgood-Schlatter disease can be diagnosed clinically based on the typical symptoms and physical examination findings. X-ray testing is sometime performed in order to document the status of the calcification at the insertion of kneecap (patellar) tendon. Sometimes a tiny piece of the bone of the tibia actually is pulled away by the inflamed tendon.

    What is the treatment and outlook for Osgood-Schlatter disease?

    Patients with Osgood-Schlatter disease can be helped by antiinflammation and pain-relieving medications, ice, and rest. Osgood-Schlatter disease typically goes away over time (months to years after the normal bone growth stops). Some adults who have had Osgood-Schlatter disease are left with “knobby” appearance to the front of the knee.

    Osgood-Schlatter Disease At A Glance
    Osgood-Schlatter disease is a painful inflammation in the front of the bony leg below the knee.
    Osgood-Schlatter disease can cause local pain, inflammation, swelling, and calcification.
    Osgood-Schlatter disease can be diagnosed by the history and examination.
    Osgood-Schlatter disease can be helped by antiinflammation and pain-relieving medications, ice, and rest.

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